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advisory on hurrican irene. we want to go to rob marciano who will tell us what this latest advisory is about. >> it's frightening, up to 85-mile-an-hour wind now. there's a possibility from reading some nuggets from the national hurricane center that it could strengthen some more. we knew we had that possibility. still over the gulf stream where waters are still warm enough to sustain a hurricane. also getting into an environment where it favored strengthening. that's what we've seen. here it is in the satellite picture. 85-mile-an-hour winds. that's a moderate strength category one storm with possible strengthening as we go through time. about 380 miles south of new york city it's movement has picked up northerly about 15 miles an hour and we still expect that turn toward the west later on. this is huge. reading some technical stuff, the tropical storm force winds, diameter nearly 800 miles wide. that is huge. the second largest tropical system we've seen in the last few decades. hurricane force winds extend 150 miles out. the amount of damaging winds is about 350 to 400 m
irene which do cause some minor flooding in this area. they're concerned this could cause major flooding. there was a study out of columbia university that said had hurricane irene been one foot worse it could have caused an additional $50 billion in damage. the fear here is that if the water comes up over this seawall, which is right here next to me, it could flood the subway tunnels, even the electrical grid here. mayor michael bloomberg said he's considering shutting down two electrical networks in lower manhattan. that would shut down power to some 17,000 people but it could quickly get much, much higher than that. as the day continues we're expecting this storm surge to grow. high tide is about 8:50 tonight. there's a full moon so it's an even higher tide than usual. if that storm surge of six to eleven feet hits right at that bad moment, that is what concerns them most, soledad. >> of course, john, it's cold! usually when we cover these hurricanes it's much warmer. but if they lose power, as many people are predicting, 10 million people up along the east coast could lose power, you
evacuations in the low-lying areas of queens and brooklyn. he ordered that in hurricane irene and thankfully, there were no problems at that time. but officials taking this very seriously, potentially flooding in brooklyn and queens on the atlantic ocean and new york bay, as hurricane sandy bears down on the northeast. we will have continuing live coverage, throughout the hour. >> the fox extreme weather alert for you, the national hurricane center issuing the latest advisory on hurricane sandy, set to strike in the north evert. a rare super storm. the hurricane lashing north carolina with pounding winds and rain. massive waves are crashing ark shore on the outer banks. people in connecticut are bracing for the worst with the governor declaring a state of emergency there. let's return to our chief meteorologist. you know, rick, we heard mayor michael bloomberg ordering mandatory evacuations for low-lying areas in brooklyn and queens. you are talking about hundreds and thousands of people and shutting down the subway and buses. >> this happened last year in hurricane irene and it wasn't that
you can see the trees. hurricane irene they lost enough trees. $22,000 worth of trees fell down. this storm expected to be much tougher, more devastating than hurricane irene. look at this. that's a scaffold around an art project. new york city is full of scaffolding like that. things that we are watching today. want to head it over now to "cnn newsroom." newsroom." they're up next. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning to you. i sure hope you're keeping dry somewhere. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for being with us. we begin this morning with hurricane sandy, within hours expected to explode into this superstorm. most of us have never season anything like it in our lifetime. already huge, tropical storm force winds spanning a width of nearly 1,000 mimes. it's aiming at the heart of the east coast, the most heavily populated corridor in the country. 50 million people are expected to feel the effects. hundreds of thousands are now under evacuation orders. fema predicts damage costs of about $3 billion just for wind damage alone. heavy rains or snow, storm
the winners, so to speak, and the losers because it is asymmetric, right? >>> now last year hurricane irene's initial projections were $7 billion. turned out to be $15 billion. there were a lot of ancillaries once the checks come out from the government and private insurers. stimulus to the gdp. not big enough to move the needle. this one we're getting initial projections is much bigger. the two cohorts in stocks most impacted the home depot-like places, let's call them that, they were basically moved up a day ahead of the storm and then pulled off once the market turned out to be. >> we didn't see much of that on friday in terms of home depot or at lowe's which i thought was interesting and most of the retailers have closed their books on saturday, last saturday, so the impact of the storm won't actually be seen until the following quarter or the next month when they report retail sales. lowe's is the exception. they closed books on saturday. all the runup, the generators they've sold, the batteries, the flashlights, those things were almost sold out pretty much across the board. that shou
. during irene it was 4.4. we expect to double what we had in irene. that's the problem. that's what kicked in yesterday and that's why the mandatory evacuation order was kicked in. the storm is deep in low pressure, and we expect the wind field to push this water up through long island sound and just to give you an example. you can see what's going on here in terms of how high water is. it's below the sea wall, but it's probably going to be about a good third of the way up this pole. that brings it all the way back into the battery and probably into lower parts of manhattan as well. parts of wall street will probably flood, so we anticipate this water to be much higher. the only difference in it could be the fact that it's going to come up gradually as opposed to quick like with the storm surge. not gradual in like 20 minutes but maybe over an hour or so we see that water coming up and coming up. we see the tunnels here shut down. the brooklyn tunnels now shout done, the holland tunnel is closing at 2:00 this afternoon. that's an order from the governor. when you see things like that occur
year, hurricane irene had less than five feet of surge. but that made driving through the wall street area an adventure. new york city is lucky to have the high-rises. be very clear. this ain't irene. the water will come. could be 8, 10, 12 feet high. as brave as you are, we won't be here tomorrow morning in this spot. >> we won't. a lot of tourists are out now, now gnat we have daylight out. there's much more of the storm to come. we'll cover it all morning long. >> let's take a look at the tourists. times square normally crammed with traffic at this time. people out there walking around, taking it all in. sandy has forced new york city officials to shut down the subways for the second time in in city's history. josh, a lot fewer people than usual. >> it's not just less crowded. everything here is shuttered. the winds pick up the rain again starts to fall. this is a subway station closed for business. not the only station that is. every station throughout the city is closed as new york prepares for the superstorm. this morning, the largest transit system in the country closed down. t
're all so unique. i try to focus on the consequences. for the northeast, i think after last year's irene, we pretty well reminded everybody northeast has a hurricane threat. >> all right. >> they would like to reopen trading by wednesday of this week at the latest. >> do many insurance companies cover this type of sdmer. >> many don't. they don't include flood insurance, water damage. many homeowners if they look at their policies will recognize that hurricanes in many cases aren't covered. they would have to buy insurance through the government insurance for flooding and many haven't done that. we might find out there are plenty of people after this that don't have the coverage they would need. >> thank you. >>> the presidential campaigns have canceled more than a dozen events because of sandy. president obama called off appearances today in florida, ohio, and virginia. and another one tomorrow in wisconsin so he can monitor storm developments. we have more from the obama campaign from orlando. >> reporter: good morning, charlie, nornora, and viewers in the west.
manhattan shattering the previous record that because set by eileen whic irene which folks thought was pretty bad 14 months ago. sandy was nearly 1600 miles when it caught up with the winter storm in diameter and created very dangerous seas over a stretch of the atlant atlantic nearly 1600 miles in diameter. it has been a devastating storm. we are waiting right now for an update from the new york city mayor michael bloomberg on all of this. you've seen our reporters have been out there this morning and been devastating.us the damage that the scene where mayor bloomberg will be moments away. look at these pictures, it literally rushed into the shoreline of new jersey last night. 80-mile an hour wind there, pushed a wall of water inland -frbgs looking a -- look at the flooding in these areas. this shows us the true scope but it's yet to be completely understood. we start this with a brand-new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. >> i'm bill hemmer. good morning again we are live in the battleground state, columbus, ohio today. the mayor again briefs in a matter of mome
surge if it is as forecast, which will be worse than hurricane irene last year, could create some serious problems in terms of getting in to the subway system, in terms of getting into the con ed steam lines and potentially the electrical system. and so even if the wind doesn't blow out power, there could be pry empty differen preemptive power outages. so that's one of the many reasons that they decided to hunger down with all the financial markets. stay home, there's money to be made later and we'll just deal with it. for now just a little bit of a breeze blowing here. that is clearly supposed to chan change. >> where do you go later? >> you have to find a pole, right? you know that that's -- every guy out in a strong breeze, you've seen -- you've got to find a pole around there, right? >> i'll look for it. there's light poles and stuff, but i think i need to get a little further away from the water. >> yeah, that would be a good idea, too. >> we'll have to get him a bungee cord. okay. let's get a little bit more on the forecast on the storm in maria larosa. >> as you mentioned,
a blustery, nasty day. >> before this made landfall, this storm seemingly crushed irene. there really is no comparison, right? >> there's no comparison. i guess you could say, this is kind of like new york city's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet, all that water coming on in and the high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here unfortunately. >> all right. mark mann cue sew from accuweather. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy and what the red cau cross is doing to help out. >> plus more incredible rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. en. we'll be right back. >> announcer: "america this morning" brought to you by 5 hour energy. 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer resea
deep. that water has now come up, and we're well above the levels that we were during hurricane irene. that was expected as the storm surge now comes in, and as i said the wind picks up, and it's going to get worse as the -- as the evening goes on. all of the bridges now in and out of manhattan closed. the east river and the hudson river as well as the verazzano bridge that connects brooklyn and staten island. manhattan literally is now an island. there is also now the concern that conedison the local utility has raise that had they may have to do preemptive power outages, if it looks like some of the low-lying areas are going to flood to protect the underground equipment. they would do power outages, so so much for the utility of having utilities and elect call wires under a ground. that can be an issue as well when storm surges rise. we'll be back with more as our special coverage goes on. guys, back to you. >> thank you so much, scott. that's why we have so many issues with the exchange. that's the neighborhood where the new york stock exchange is. back to the dramatic picture in m
. a lot of people said they were not going to ride it out like they did irene. it's hard to say. you can see some of the windows in some of these high rises where there is power to them, generator power or what have you, but obviously it's very dark down here in lower manhattan with the power that's been shut off on purpose in many areas and that's the con edison said that they are doing that so they can easily -- more easily restore power once this storm goes through. but they've got a lot on their hands tonight, as we mentioned, with that explosion on one of the transformers on the other side. >> ida single, thank you so much. if we can go back to that video that we were just looking at, for people that have not seen the coverage throughout the evening, this is a picture of a crane atop a luxury high rise in midtown manhattan. it has been dangling precariously, dangerously off the top of that building which has become known in manhattan as the global billionaire's club because the nine full floors at the top have been sold to billionaires. two of the dupe pleks are $90 million each. yo
million people could lose power. that compares to about 7 million that lost power during irene. and it could take a week to get everybody back up and running because they won't be able to start putting things back together again until probably wednesday and it will be another five to seven days after that. big, big hit to the economy. >> paul, thank you so much. i know you're going to be with us for the next few days as we continue to work through hurricane sandy. thank you, paul. >>> all right. tyler, over to you. >> thank you, sue. hurricane sandy of course bearing down, point pleasant, new jersey. some utilities bracing for the worse. we just talk a little bit about that. warning customers that they could be out of power for a week, ten days, maybe more. what kind of damage are we talking about here and will some utilities perform better than others. greg gordon is senior managing director at isi group. mr. gordon, welcome, good to see you. can any utility that will be affected by this storm be described as a potential winner? >> no. look, these companies are regulated. they
? >> well, charlie, it's a major disaster in new jersey. and, you know i've gone through irene, the october snow storm, the blizzard in 2010. this is, by far, the worst thing we've gone through. we have 2.4 million people or households, rather without power, over 200 state roads closed. it wasn't actually a levee. it was a berm and the berm was overwhelmed by the tidal surge that came up the raritan bay. we are in the process of rescue rescuing people from moonachie, in middlesex county rescuing people from their homes not from river flooding but tidal surge from the bays. not even to mention what's happened on the jersey coastline, which i think in the long run will be the part of the state that's the most devastate ed ed. you saw the scenes yesterday from up and down our coast. new jersey, obviously, this is where it came onshore. i think the state of new jersey took it in the neck worse than any other state. it's going to take us a while to dig out from under it but we will dig out from under it. >> many people waking up now to all the damage. can you calculate how mu
on the boardwalk. many people have heeded the warnings. they are remembering what happened with irene last year. other people are saying, you know, we have been through the storms before. we are hunkering down and we are not leaking. of course, our fingers are crossed for them. connell: along the shoreline, for better or worse with a large group of people. dagen: breaking news on the water moving into new york city and manhattan our sister station is reporting that parts of fdr drive, this is one of the two main arteries in and out of new york city that runs along the edge of manhattan. on the east side of manhattan is fdr drive, that is now underwater according to fox five. fdr drive is on the east side of manhattan. this is a critical artery of moving traffic in and out of new york city. at 2:00 p.m. eastern time, both the holland and brooklyn battery tunnel will be closing. if people are not in the city or out of the city in a matter of hours, you will not have a choice. you will have to stay right where you are. dagen: if you went up the right side of the horseshoe there, the east river is
aring going to be soft. >> and you mentioned irene, and while that was a year ago, new york city did not get pummeled by irene. the mayor of new york city is urging very seriously to take this warning of this storm. there's nothing going to be no hot water, there's going to be no heat in those low-lying areas, he certainly is encurlinging people to go to those evacuation locations or seek higher ground, or find a friend who is in a higher level place. >> i felt for the mayor when i was in lincoln, nebraska do my first weather show. call for the radar, is the radar there? and it never showed up. the mayor talked about -- but we made one here for you to all of the low areas that would be if we do get this eight to ten b and then all of a sudden we have a whole other list of things to do. in all of those public places, they are going to turn off the heat and the water and ac. they won't need ac, this is going to be a cold storm, they want people out of there, they truly do. >> just as we were talking, we have some new information involving the new york stock exchange. of course that's l
experts predict considerable flooding in an area that has little elevation. last year, irene, and driving through the wall street area. now, last year, you and i were standing almost exactly here to get a very different situation. the surge isn't going to bring just water. it's going to bring force. and that's why we don't know how it will affect an area like this already in evacuation. people aren't living in the area where we are right now. if the forecasters, not you, sam, but everybody in general, close to accurate, this place is going to look very different tomorrow. maybe permanently. >> chris, we're standing right here where the water is up on the edge. last year where we were here, the water was two or feet below that. didn't really get to the top until the middle of the storm. >> absolutely. >> amy. >> chris, sam, thanks so much. we want to take a look at times square. because normally at this hour, it's crammed with traffic. well, look at that, it is a virtual ghost town. sandy has forced officials to shut down the subways for the second time in its history. josh is out on times
storms in 1878 and 1903 and then hurricane irene became a tropical storm when it hit just last year. now, hurricane irene caused roughly $15 billion in damage all across the northeast. the state of new jersey alone got $275 million in federal assistance most going to homeowners and flooding private insurers. here in cape may, commercial fishing is the big business. a billion dollars in revenue for new jersey. further up atlantic city of course we know all of those casinos, 12 flagship institutions across the boardwalk are closed and halloween parties canceled. atlantic city is lower lying. that will be a very, very big hit. the place to watch. evacuated yesterday by 4:00 p.m. and chris christie declaring a state of emergency there because of how bad conditions are supposed to get there. it's only 9:00 a.m. right now. you can see how bad it's getting. the waves are spilling up into the dunes and there is flooding in the street. there's structural damage just a couple blocks away that we'll check out. definitely a strengthening storm here on the shore of new jersey. carl? >> kayla, thank y
for this outdoor reporting. >> been bringing us great updates. >> she dade great job too last year with irene. i think she was in north carolina. >> anyway, we'll check back in with kayla later this morning. let's also take a look at the markets. the futures are indicated higher after all the concerns that have been out there. the s&p futures up by more than 9.5 points. the dow futures are up by 65 points. not a lot of news stories that have been coming through. you've heard some earnings here and there. yesterday we had ford out early with better than expected numbers early. and there are a few other stories that have been out there, too. you guys see the ubs story? >> 10,000 jobs. >> 10,000 jobs this they were laying off. a lot of people found out when they showed up for work in london and their cards didn't work. other people found out because their e-mail kept bouncing back. that's the worst situation i've ever heard. it's not going to get nearly enough attention because of all the other things that are happening out there. >> did you see the other big merger yesterday? disney and "star wars
of the power outages. that is twice the number of houses impacted by hurricane irene last year. at least 18 deaths reported in seven states. for a little more perspective, how about this? one in six people are without power in new york, pennsylvania and new jersey. in new jersey we find ron, a spokesperson for new jersey power and light. what are you dealing with right now? >> we're dealing with outages to more than 930,000 customers. that is a significant portion of the 1.1 million customers we serve throughout the state. jenna: we saw that explosion at the substation. it was a big dramatic moment that affected power in the city of manhattan. did you have something similar out in new jersey? what caused the power outages? >> we did not have something similar to that we took some of the substations in barrier island communities and coastal communities off-line for safety reasons last night. our biggest concern is damage to our transmission lines of the we've started our assessment process and the winds will cooperate a little bit today we'll get helicopters up in the air to do an aerial ass
. >> that is true. what happened is we had a combination of hurricane irene and hurricane lee. that happened in 1955 with tremendous amounts of water build up. but in this case, it is the storm surge that did the dirty work because the way turned into the coast. again, i want to stress to people that heat and drought and hurricanes along the eastern seaboard are something we will have to deal with for the next several years because of the overall pattern. cooling pacific very warm and women. then we will be back to where we were in the 60s and 70s again. dagen: left hook of the storm, the ride home untransformed hitting us in new york city. if anything, on the jersey shore, that is different than hurricane irene when we saw it. >> that is exactly right. the hurricane is pushing a hand of water up through. in the 1938 hurricane, it doesn't bring a whole heck of a lot. from the storm passed to the left, it does. 15 feet of water in providence, rhode island. imagine that. 3800 of an inch of rain. less than connecticut, all through the delaware valley, tremendous flooding going on there. the same type o
of that was west of the coast, at least where i was we didn't get the rain we got with irene, not even close. >> right, we were most concerned about the flooding because of the tidal action. right there, yeah, the surge, we have wonderful beaches and between dewey beach and bethany beach we had to close route 1. there are a lot of others we had to close throughout the state. the bay communities were hit hard but we've got people out looking right now. we think we escaped the worst of it. >> and total cost for delaware, any idea yet in. >> we don't know. we have people as we say looking right now, i think it will take us a little while to figure that out. certainly concerned about the 44,000 families without power but we're obviously looking forward to utility crews getting out there as soon as, once conditions permit them to be out there. they can't be in harm's way if the winds are too high. >> for your state was this not as significant or not as negative of an outcome as irene, governor? >> well, i mean i'd put it this way we have a lot of flooding and we do have 40,000 plus people without
% or more out at this hour. and as we saw with irene then again with the october snowstorm, it can take a long time, perhaps a week or even nine or ten days before the power gets restored for a lot of folks. >> jeff stecker from wvit. thank you for that update. to the point he was making that it's so dark outside, there's so much water out there, there are so many downed lines. take this advice. this came from the fairfield police chief. "we have limited responsibilities, please stay inside your house and we are expecting massive damage." and i think that that would apply to communities up and down the eastern seaboard. we will continue msnbc's live coverage of hurricane sandy right after this. [ ryan ] it doesn't get any better than endless shrimp at red lobster. you can mix and match all day! [ male announcer ] don't miss red lobster's endless shrimp, just $14.99! try as much as you like, any way you like! like parmesan crusted shrimp. hurry in, offer ends soon! i'm ryan isabell and i see food differently. hurry in, offer ends soon! wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo
there near lincoln center. you heard so many people say -- "is this going to be like irene?" hit last august. this storm crushed irene. absolutely no comparison. pieces of buildings falling in the street like that one there. >> you saw the tree. at my family's home, we're okay, just -- and the debris that is flying. that we have to look out for. >> the lower e this broadcast is real time captioned by ca
in years. that sounds very dramatic, but it isn't so when you think about what irene did to connecticut last year. irene, many people in new york and new jersey rolled their eyes at it and said it wasn't a very big deal. here in connecticut it was a very big deal. here in fairfield there were houses with not just broken windows, houses knocked off foundation and thrown into the water. they expect this to be even worse, the storm surge to be even worse here than it was during irene. so that's the major concern. there's the mandatory evacuations up and down the connecticut coast. the good news is that most people are heeding those evacuation orders. the other big concern is power outages. all the wind they are expecting to get up here, because the wind is going to be very strong up on the northern edge of this storm. the wind will cause a lot of power outages along with that flooding. they expect -- connecticut light and power expect as many as 600,000 people to be without power here in connecticut for days on end. during irene they were without power for days on end as well so everybody
of impacted households as hurricane irene. hurricane high ren was irene .2. 1.2 are pse&g. 935,000 from jcp & l. 195,000 from atlantic city electric. and 45,000 from orange and rockland. during hurricane irene restoration took eight days for full restoration. for hurricane sandy full restoration may, in fact, take longer. full damage assessment will not be complete until 24 to 48 hours due to some of the weather delays. they cannot develop a time frame for restoration until damage estimates are under way and obviously these difficult weather conditions are making this more of a challenge. however, the utility companies have continued to reach out to other states for assistance and we're expecting additional linemen and service men from states as far away from texas and indiana and even folks coming in to us from canada. it will remain dangerous in areas where trees and wires are down. ask people to use extreme caution. assume any wire you see down is a live wire and please do not go near it. there are currently 173 incidents statewide involving highways and lane closures. most of these clos
,000 by hurricane irene 2011 quote the largest storm related outage in our history and again, 1.2 million, pl and without electricity at this hour and we're going to keep following this for you, they had 25,000 power crews on stand by that they brought in according to pepco, the utility in washington d.c. and 25,000 men and women additional force flown in from mexico, canada, and washington state poise today dispatch the crews. charles: it's a herculean effort or a herculean task. a lot of people without power, thanks, adam. >> you've got it. charles: joining us a spokeman for con-ed, the utility company in new york city, alfonso, can you fill us in on how things are looking. >> sure thing. the updated number for people in new york city and westchester county and that number is actually 729,000 customers out throughout new york city and westchester county and we're looking at about, in manhattan, where the bulk of them are at at this point, 240,000 customers out. charles: alfonso, how does con edison assess where to go initially, to to help initially, is there a system for figuring out priori
. irene brought in $4.3 billion in damage last year. it was one of the top ten costliest u.s. returns in history. the insurance adjusters are already on the scene they could go in as early as wednesday and write checks on the spot for policyholders>> wall street some of the banks are heclosed today. >> they are closed today and likely tomorrow. electronic trading late last night much of lower manhattan has already been evacuated. they are operating on a work at home basis. heather? >> here is something of major concern we have seen gas prices dip recently but they could be on their way up. that's because refineries could be shut down. >> 6 northeast oil refineries could be affected they have 6.2 million of barrels a day. october 1st the official month in the 2013 model year. if some of the car dearlies shut down they may not be unloading the vehicles. >> keep our fishings crossed on gas prices and insurance issues as well. >> lauren thank you so much. >> good to see you. quick look at headlines. he was the prime suspect. ainsley take it away from here. >> he was the prime suspect in t
at the height of irene so the areas are seeing water rising storm surge and we could see 20' to 30' waves on top of that so this area right along here could be rewritten. it could be devastating for all of the beach areas. your daytime as we head through the evenings rain will increase, it is going to be a wind event and it will be a storm surge event. we will see incredible beach erosion. overnight, gusts at over 100 miles per hour for all of 9 areas shaded in orange as the center moves onshore in the next several hours to the north of cape may. the north si bring the worst of the storm surge and the worst of the rain and the worst of the wind. on tuesday, still, heavy rain and tropical storm force gusts and maybe hurricane gusts. then the snowy part of storm in feet across the appalachian mountains. that is for the record books already. >>neil: amazing. now, down to outside the new york stock exchange the sand bags are literally outside the big board headquarters and they have shut trading down today. they will shut trading down tomorrow, as william. but, today, by the way, if you keep track t
during hurricane irene, so they knew what to do. they knew exactly when to leave. they got there immediately once they were advised to leave. so we're really proud of these folks in the shelter and, you know, they just seem to be having a good time. they are in a safe place. they've got warm meals and they've got the support of the american red cross to get them through these hard times, because when they go home, they don't know what they're going to expect. they could go home to severe flooding and severe damage to their homes so having that safety net right now is so important. >> well, besides the shelters which obviously are critically important and could continue to be so because as you say of flooding and we're hearing that some of these power outages could be long term, what are the priorities of the services that the red cross will provide in the next couple of days? >> yes, we've already gone ahead and told them and pre-positioned over 100 emergency response vehicles and thousands of relief supplies, cots, blanket, food and deployed odd thousand of volunteers so o
. we have seen hurricane irene, people were without power for weeks. >> a significant number of folks in long island. >> thank you. that was al from connecticut light and power. >> we want to head over to nick gregory. this begs the question of what we are talking about all evening as we move further north. the storm surges. at what point, which towns and cities are going to be hitting those? >> we were concerned about western long island sound. the hudson surge will be coming down now as the tide goes out. as i have been watching, i have good news to report. somewhat good news. the water is still a flood stage in the western long island sound, but as we are watching, we are approaching high tide. but the surge is actually not as bad as we were thinking. that is good good news. the thought was we could get up to about 16 or maybe 17 feet. but it stopped at about 14.3 feet and is now all the way down. about 13.7 beta right now. right here in the western part of long island sound. positive news again, still above flood stage. it is still floating right now, but it least it is not as hi
in new york harbor right now, a half a foot higher than hurricane irene. when the high tide starts to flood in late this afternoon, early this evening, we'll see record-breaking surge hikes. >> does that mean water goes in the subway? >> probably. >> probably. >> i don't know what kind of sandbagging efforts that they're going to be having in place. i mean, since irene, i know they've taken some steps to see if they can get some sort of better protection from subway entrances, but the official forecast is calling for a 10 hfgs to 12-foot storm tide and it only needs to be 10.5 feet to flood the subway. >> jeff, we've seen the pictures. we keep hearing the adjectives colossal, gigantic, to describe it. almost in november, cold in the north. how does a storm like this size form? >> well, it started in the caribbean, which it's always warm enough year around to make hurricanes form. and once it got north of the caribbean it found itself right over the gulf stream, at least over the past day or so, and it was in a very unique spot, right over an axis of the warm gulf stream waters that
to last year's hurricane? >> the issue that the damage is more extensive than it was for irene. power. be a long time to at this point, i don't think it is a good estmaste. >> brian: your original estimate 7-10 days? >> that's right. that was too optmistic. >> steve: and any advice for people with a generator and watching this and wires down in the neighborhood? >> we'll be out patrolling and the public officials urge don't go outside and don't go near electric wires or downed wires. you don't know if it is a phone or cable wire you don't know if it is wrapped up in our wires down the line. >> brian: when something like this happens, is it worth calling to report or should we assume that everyone is down and we will get to you when we can. >> customers should report an out age and if it goes off report it afterwards. >> gretchen: a lot of people can do that on line as well. if they have computer service. >> brian: i another question for you . in terms of water receding, the worst is over and water is getting out of there, is that what you are seeing? >> brian: that's what we are see w
was set back during hurricane irene. i was driving down here this morning, the entire lower part of manhattan blacked out. con edison says 250,000 homes inside new york city itself without power. the subways as you've been saying, shut down completely. six of the tubes, six of the tunnels from manhattan to queens and brooklyn flooded. they do not know when they'll get them pumped out over the next four days, they hope. again that flooding really did wreak some havoc here, soledad. >> yes, it has. we're going to have a chance later this morning. as the sun's coming up we can see the damage, john. this side there are lots of submerged cars. i'm looking at someone's tire standing in the middle of the street. that can't be good. we'll update folks on the damage on this side of manhattan. let's go to ali velshi. ali was in atlantic city yesterday and they're watching what's happening with him, where he was just being battered by the high winds, and the surf, as well. ali, i'm glad to see you in one piece, frankly. how's it going where you are? >> still a lot of wind as you can see. st
you compare this to other events you've seen? >> let's see. katrina -- or irene last year this area also flooded. but not nearly as bad as this. the clean up, it's pretty much drained within a day or so. and lost no electricity last year. this one we were -- you know, we don't know the epa. >> reporter: dan, thanks very much. good luck to you. wolf, there's one resident, one business owner here determine today recover. others here have an amazing sense of community spirit. these are all community volunteers doing all this work largely responsible for the clearing of the streets. as i mentioned, just a couple hours ago this water was up to my knees, up to the knees of these volunteers who waded out here in some very, very unhealthy and almost dangerous water because it has so much sewage and chemicals and garbage in it. >> brian, we'll get back to you in hoboken, new jersey. let's head back to manhattan. we've re-established our contact with dr. sanjay gupta. he's at bellevue hospital, sanjay, 700 patients now need to be evacuated because they've lost power, emergency generators at b
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